PinToolfree

PinTool is a simple but powerful Nuke node. It helps you to fit a 3D object into a scene. It can be used for precise positioning of still objects or even for simple object tracking. With PinTool, to manipulate a 3D model’s position, you simply drag control points on its surface (pins) to their correct position in the frame. Also PinTool is able to estimate camera focal length as you positioning an object.

Fast model positioning

using pintool

While tracking most of man-hours goes to setting up keyframes. And this is what PinTool does with ease. Fast and intuitive it lets you manipulate a 3D-model’s position by dragging control points on model’s surface (pins) to their positions in the frame

Camera Focal Length Estimation

estimate focal length
focal length estimation

Sometimes camera focal length should be known. For example for tracking. But sometimes you have to deal with footage which is shot with unknown lens. Don’t worry – PinTool helps you to figure it out.

Advanced model drawing

render setup knobs
lit wireframe

There are a lot of render settings simplifying work with PinTool. There is a Motion Blur mode for fast moving objects, automatically adjusted wireframe opacity helping to stay focused on tracking on different zoom levels and lit wireframe to underline model details even in wireframe mode. Colour setup knobs are also available for almost everything from wireframe to surface mask colour.

PinTool FAQ

How do I start using PinTool if I can't see an object through a camera?

Press ‘center geo’ button to position the object in front of the camera.

How do I remove a pin?

Click with right mouse button on a pin to remove it.

What camera is used when there is no camera connected to ‘cam’ input?

Nuke default camera is used in that case. The same as in ScanlineRender. Is has aperture of 1 and focal length of 1.

I’ve estimated focal length with no camera connected and gotten suspiciously small number. Is that OK?

As the default camera with aperture of 1 is used when ‘cam’ input is not connected, small (< 1) focal length values are absolutely normal.